Reason: faith’s greatest enemy

An example of courage. But when valor preys on reason, it eats the sword it fights with.
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“When valor preys on reason, it eats the sword it fights with.”

Over the past year I have noticed that the spirit of America has gone from bravery, valor, courage and “these colors do not run” to the best that conservatives have (Fox News) stating that, “They are coming for us.” As if to say that there is nothing 312 million armed-to-the-teeth people can do about a bunch of coward devils with swords in hand.

Reason or “reasonable” as enemy of faith and valor

When valor preys on reason, it eats the sword it fights with.

A woman (Molly Pitcher, perhaps?) services a field gun after enemy fire has killed all its crew. Title: ¡Qué valor! (What courage!) Artist: Francisco Goya.

“Not by might, nor by power, but by My Spirit saith The Lord” (Zechariah 4:6). What happened to “the land of the free because of the brave”? I can show you news report after news report, on a daily basis, of news anchors preaching from fear and doubt to the masses who are foolish enough to believe their “reasonable” reports. They’re magnifying the strength of the enemy rather then magnifying The Almighty on the behalf of those who believe (Psalm 78).

Again, “When valor preys on reason, it eats the sword it fights with.”

Friends, let me explain:

Reason is faith’s greatest enemy, and when you walk by reason you make faith obsolete!

As Christians we “walk by faith not by sight” (2 Corinthians 5:7). The question I would ask you is: Where is your faith? Mine is in God. The God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. The God of our Lord Jesus Christ. The King of Kings and the Lord of Lords. The Lion of the tribe of Judah. The Man of War! The God that said, “Call unto Me and I will answer thee, and shew thee great and mighty things, which thou knowest not” (Jeremiah 33:3). The God Who said that He would, “show Himself strong in the behalf of those whose hearts are perfect [by grace] towards Him” (2 Chronicles 16:9), and “Greater works will you do then I did because I go unto My Father” (John 14:12).

Time to reclaim faith and ignore “the reasonable”

So, my friends, God the Father lays to your candor, “Who hath believed our report? And to whom is the arm of the Lord revealed?” (Isaiah 53:1) I can tell you, to those who respond in faith because they believe.

It is time for America to stand up and be counted, regardless of the circumstances we have in front of us. We have an opportunity, America, to prove our God. So, I ask, whose report are you going to believe? God’s, or man’s?

Video: How to be Victorious in Christ:

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Bradlee Dean is an ordained Christian preacher, Radio show host for the #1 show on Genesis Communication Network from 2-3 p.m. central standard (The Sons of Liberty), a National Tea Party favorite. He also speaks on high school and college campuses nationwide. Bradlee is also an author, a husband to one, daddy to four boys. You have probably seen Bradlee through such outlets as The New York Times, Fox News, MSNBC, CNN, The Weekly Standard etc.

One Response to Reason: faith’s greatest enemy

  1. MatthewJ says:

    What an unusual essay. Whatever the takeaway message is supposed to be, it appears that the author has totally misunderstood the Shakespeare quote from _Antony and Cleopatra_.

    “When valor preys on reason, it eats the sword it fights with” is a line from Enobarbus, one of Antony’s loyal lieutenants. It is a complaint about Antony’s emotional and impulsive behavior; Antony has displayed this fault multiple times during the play, and his actions have resulted in his losing many battles when he sought out engagement under conditions that played to the strengths of his opponents rather than those of his own forces – despite the sage counsel of his experienced advisors Enobarbus is so tired of it that he at last decides to abandon Antony’s cause. He is arguing here that reason is what allows courage to be effective; mere enthusiasm or devotion to the cause does not win the war. Another way to put it might be ‘fools rush in where wise men fear to tread’. There are a bunch of other lines from the play that convey the same idea: ‘never anger made good guard for itself’; ‘[an enraged] dove will peck the [ostrich, with no effect]’; ‘Wisdom and fortune combating together,If that the former dare but what it can, no chance may shake it.’

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