Reciprocity and extradition

Flag of Mexico, country of refugees. (Or can a new President fight corruption by removing disrespected laws?) Trump replaced NAFTA with a new bilateral agreement. But why do so many of Trump's opponents fly the Mexican flag, anyway? Besides: Mexican immigration law is a lot harsher than ours.
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In his recent talks with Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieta, the man now occupying our White House failed to discuss the return of Marine Sgt. Andrew Tahmooressi. Sgt. Tahmooressi mistakenly entered Mexico with firearms that were registered in the USA. When he voluntarily informed the Mexican border control that he made a mistake by entering their country and had firearms on him, he was thrown in jail, where he was beaten and served dinners consisting of bread and sugar water.

Four violations of reciprocity

There are several points to be made. First, the Golden Rule that says:

Do unto others as you would have others do unto you

Flag of Mexico. Why do we get no reciprocityh from them?is essentially a law of reciprocity. Reciprocity works both ways. If the Mexican government feeds our citizens who happen to end up in their prisons nothing but bread and sugar water, shouldn’t we extend the courtesy to the many Mexican national criminals that are in our jails deservedly? That’s one point.

Next point: if Mexico is so stringent about illegal firearms entering their country, why haven’t they demanded that Eric Holder be extradited to Mexico for smuggling loads of illegal weapons into their country intentionally? And to our supreme negotiator, Barack Hussein Obama, I say, let’s trade one lying criminal attorney general for one noble marine sergeant. Now that would be a prisoner exchange I would deem worthy of negotiation.

Next point: if one of our own enters Mexico illegally (and in the case of Tahmooressi by mistake) and he is thrown in jail, beaten, treated poorly, and not given proper habeas corpus, shouldn’t we reciprocate with the many illegals that are entering our country daily – especially those carrying illegal firearms?

Last point: Mr. Obama, how dare you call yourself our Commander in Chief when you fail to negotiate – or even converse – with President Peña about freeing our marine? This is another title that you certainly do not deserve and one which you disgrace. You may think you’re getting away with destroying this country. But there is a God in heaven and I can assure you that He sees everything you are doing. He even knows where Lois Lerner’s emails are hidden. We are told to pray for our leaders and those in authority. My only prayer for you, BO, is that you don’t tempt me to sin – for every time I hear your name or see your pathetic lying face on television, I’m tempted to curse you. I can reconcile it somewhat because the Bible also tells us to hate evil, and you are just about as evil as they come. However, I do find comfort in knowing that revenge belongs to the Lord. I only hope I get to see when that revenge knocks on your door – the sooner, the better. And…I believe I speak for many Americans who feel the same way. You may be fooling some people – but the rest of us have your number.

<a href="https://www.sodahead.com/united-states/reciprocity-and-extradition/question-4380577/" title="Reciprocity and extradition">Reciprocity and extradition</a>

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RoseAnn Salanitri is a published author and Acquisition Editor for the New Jersey Family Policy Council. She is a community activist who has founded the Sussex County Tea Party in her home state and launched a recall movement against Senator Robert Menendez. RoseAnn is also the founder of Veritas Christian Academy, as well as co-founder of Creation Science Alive, and a national creation science speaker.

12 Responses to Reciprocity and extradition

  1. Fergus Mason says:

    “When he voluntarily informed the Mexican border control that he made a mistake by entering their country and had firearms on him”

    I believe he was stopped and searched, at which point three firearms were found in his vehicle.

    • Terry A. Hurlbut says:

      You imply he was deliberately trying to conceal them. If so, you have bought the government line. Hasn’t it occurred to you that the Mexican government is demanding some kind of foreign-policy ransom from this (de facto) President? And holding Andrew Tahmooressi hostage to that end?

  2. Fergus Mason says:

    “Hasn’t it occurred to you that the Mexican government is demanding some kind of foreign-policy ransom from this (de facto) President? And holding Andrew Tahmooressi hostage to that end?”

    Doesn’t seem likely, does it? Quite bluntly, at the level of international relations he’s not much of a hostage. There’s also the minor detail that they didn’t kidnap him; he drove into their country with a bunch of guns. His captivity was initiated by himself, not by Mexico. That’s not how holding people for ransom tends to work.

    • Terry A. Hurlbut says:

      Mexican active-duty personnel make the same mistake in reverse, and our authorities send them back. Why won’t the Mexican authorities reciprocate?

  3. Fergus Mason says:

    “Mexican active-duty personnel make the same mistake in reverse, and our authorities send them back.”

    On duty? Or driving around in civilian clothes and a private vehicle with a bunch of non-issue weapons?

  4. Fergus Mason says:

    “Both. Neither does it matter.”

    Yes it does. For comparison, say an Irishman crosses into Northern Ireland with a rifle. If he’s in an Irish Army uniform you show him where he is on the map and point him south. If he’s in civilian clothes you arrest him. Whether he’s on or off duty absolutely matters. It’s a vital point.

    • Terry A. Hurlbut says:

      That’s because MI-5 has reason to suspect the Irishman in civilian clothes is bent on mass murder. The Mexican authorities have no such grounds to suspect one who identifies himself properly as an active-duty Marine and even declares what he is carrying. Or did you miss that little item?

  5. Fergus Mason says:

    “The Mexican authorities have no such grounds to suspect one who identifies himself properly as an active-duty Marine and even declares what he is carrying.”

    Apart from the fact that he entered their country with a bunch of guns? Whether or not he declared them doesn’t actually matter; he wasn’t allowed to have them. The fact that he’s a member of the USMC doesn’t matter either. He wasn’t on duty. If he was the USA would have an obligation to get him back; as they didn’t send him there they don’t have any such obligation.

    I still haven’t found out what border crossing he used but if it was the one at Tijuana then the idea that he entered Mexico by accident just doesn’t hold water.

    • Terry A. Hurlbut says:

      I did not know three guns constituted “a bunch.”

      Are you convinced he was deliberately running those guns to some contact(s) or other?

  6. Fergus Mason says:

    “Are you convinced he was deliberately running those guns to some contact(s) or other?”

    Nope. In fact I’d be astonished if he was. I do think he was suffering from mental health issues that probably affected his decision making process, and for that reason I’d rather see him repatriated. Trying to break out of jail probably wasn’t the smartest move on his part though.

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