Democracy – why it doesn’t work

Thomas Jefferson promoted liberty, not license. He is a prize example of American exceptionalism. He also warned against Islam and the threat it poses.
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It’s hard to know what to write about these days. No sooner do you focus on one issue, then another one catches your attention – like asking Mr. Holder to investigate Mr. Holder. Mr. Alinksy’s tactics seem to be working. But what else can you expect when low-information voters out number well-informed voters? You can expect that evil men and women will take advantage of them for their own political gain, and you can expect that a well-designed Constitutional Republic starts turning into a democracy.

Have we a democracy?

If you ask people on the street what kind of a government we have, chances are the majority will tell you we have a democracy. Up to a few years ago, they would have been wrong – now-a-days they are more right than we are willing to admit.

Thomas Jefferson did not believe in democracy

Thomas Jefferson. Portrait: Rembrandt Peale, 1800. Photo: White House Historical Association

Thomas Jefferson once said:

A wise and frugal government, which shall leave men free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor and bread it has earned – this is the sum of good government.

Today we have anything but good government. We have precisely what Jefferson and our Founders feared most: an electorate that has discovered that it can vote itself the fruits of someone else’s labors by electing politicians that promise them the world. The problem is that “the world” has to be paid for by someone. Greed is a vice that is blamed for much, but today it is masked as Social Justice and it entices the low-information voters under the auspices of entitlements. In other words, they are led to believe that somehow they are entitled to the fruits of someone else’s labor – that this is justice. This situation is exacerbated by opportunist preachers who tell the greedy what they want to hear instead of the truth, which puts them in the same category as the opportunist politician.

Hope in knowledge and action

For those who understand just how dire a situation this is, frustration can sometimes rule the day. However, there is hope. As long as God is in His heaven, there is always hope. But hope requires that those of us who do understand the predicaments we are facing, purpose in our hearts to be bold and not lay down and play dead. The Bible says that in the latter days the love of many will grow cold because lawlessness abounds. Today we see that being fulfilled right before our very eyes. It is what can be expected in a democracy. Contrary to popular belief, democracies (which are little more than mob rule) always implode. Democracies are about greed, while Republics are about doing the right thing.

As the primaries in New Jersey are just about upon us, I am asking for the prayers of the rest of the nation – prayers that God will have mercy on us and redeem our republican form of government. The State of Virginia is showing signs that sanity can be restored to government over greed. I will continue to hope and pray that New Jersey will follow suit. And I will hope that the rest of the country will join in that prayer. Democracies may not work – never have, but prayers always have. America, pray that the insanity in New Jersey and the rest of the country be stopped – one election at a time.

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RoseAnn Salanitri is a published author and Acquisition Editor for the New Jersey Family Policy Council. She is a community activist who has founded the Sussex County Tea Party in her home state and launched a recall movement against Senator Robert Menendez. RoseAnn is also the founder of Veritas Christian Academy, as well as co-founder of Creation Science Alive, and a national creation science speaker.

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