Bible or Bayonet?

Remedies for a culture run amuck. Who are the soldiers of the cross?
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Men, in a word, must necessarily be controlled either by a power within them or by a power without them; either by the Word of God or by the strong arm of man; either by the Bible or by the bayonet.

– Robert Winthrop, Speaker of the House

Public schools in America are becoming testing and training grounds for a monitored police state. Through man’s 10,000 commandments (all in the name of “safety” and “security”), you now have fences around the schools, metal detectors before entering school buildings, surveillance cameras and even armed guards – all because there are those who want to see what happens when you dare God’s justice by departing from His Commandments.

Exit Bible; enter man’s myriad laws

It has been stated that if you will not listen to God’s Ten Commandments, you will listen to man’s 10,000 commandments. And man’s 10,000 commandments can be seen today through the thousands of unconstitutional, un-American policies and measures forced on the American people on a daily basis. As one would expect, unconstitutional government produces bondage rather than liberty. Charles de Montesquieu rightly said,

Liberty is the right to do what the law permits.

The Geneva Bible. The Bible predicted the madness of our modern era.

A Geneva Bible, translated 1560, printed 1612. Photo: Mike Quinn, CC BY-SA 2.0 Generic License

Did you know that in many schools across the country, you were required to pass Bible courses before you could graduate high school? All the way up until 1962, prayer was the norm for virtually every school in America and the Ten Commandments were posted in school hallways. The obvious fruit was safety and security, as well as life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

In 1980, the Ten Commandments were taken out of the schools in the case Stone v. Graham. The Court made the following statement:

If the posted copies of the Ten Commandments are to have any effect at all, it will be to induce the schoolchildren to read, meditate upon, perhaps to venerate and obey, the Commandments… [which] is not a permissible … objective.

Cases such as this one can be linked to the quick downward spiral of American freedom, for freedom cannot exist without morality.

I came across some scenarios that exemplify my point:

High school in 1962 vs. 2013

Scenario 1

Johnny goes duck hunting before school and then pulls into the school parking lot with his shotgun in his truck’s gun rack.

1962 – Vice principal comes over, looks at Johnny’s shotgun, goes to his car and gets his own shotgun to show Johnny.

2013 – School goes into lockdown and the FBI is called. Johnny is hauled off to jail and never sees his truck or his gun again. Counselors are called in for traumatized students and teachers.

Scenario 2

Tim and Mark get into a fist-fight after school.

1962 – Crowd gathers. Mark wins the fight. Tim and Mark shake hands and end up the best of friends.

2013 – Police called and the SWAT team arrives. They arrest both Tim and Mark. They are both charged with assault and battery and then expelled and put onto probation.

Scenario 3

Jeffery will not sit still in class; he continuously disrupts other students.

1962 – Jeffery is sent to the principal’s office and given a good paddling. He then returns to class, sits still and does not disrupt other students again.

2013 – Jeffery is given huge doses of Ritalin after being diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). Jeffery now becomes a zombie. The family now gets a check from the government and Jeffery becomes disabled.

Scenario 4

Billy breaks a window on his neighbor’s car.

1962 – His dad gives him a good whipping with his belt, and Billy never does it again.

2013 – Billy’s dad is arrested for child abuse. Billy is then removed from his home and sent to foster care and later joins a gang. The state psychologist is told by Billy’s sister that she remembers being abused as well. Their dad then goes to prison. Billy’s mom has an affair with the psychologist.

Scenario 5

Bradley gets a headache and takes some aspirin to school. Bradley shares aspirin with another student who also has a headache.

1962 – Bradley’s fellow student thanks him and they both feel better.

2013 – The police are called. Bradley is sent to jail and then to treatment for drug violations. Bradley’s car is searched for drugs and weapons.

Do you ever wonder what your grandparents experienced during the good old days? Well, let me show you so you can understand for yourself why Grandma rocks! (Excerpt from My War https://shop.youcanruninternational.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=110)

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Who is Bradlee Dean?

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Bradlee Dean is an ordained Christian preacher, Radio show host for the #1 show on Genesis Communication Network from 2-3 p.m. central standard (The Sons of Liberty), a National Tea Party favorite. He also speaks on high school and college campuses nationwide. Bradlee is also an author, a husband to one, daddy to four boys. You have probably seen Bradlee through such outlets as The New York Times, Fox News, MSNBC, CNN, The Weekly Standard etc.

16 Responses to Bible or Bayonet?

  1. alex says:

    You clearly haven’t been to a school lately. These scenarios are inaccurate.
    scenario one happened to a friend I knew in High school (this was 4 years ago). He recieved a 10 day detention and we were all reminded that guns aren’t allowed on school grounds, even inside our cars.
    2.
    They are unlikely to get arrested, the fight would likely have a teacher intervene and the students would recieve a few days of detention
    3
    If he can’t sit still he might get recommend to see a therapist, who might recommend some drug. That being said, a paddling would not be likely to make him more inclined to sit still. It could lead to self medication through drugs though, and would make the student resent education. It was more acceptable to quit high school in the 60s, other jobs existed. Not the case nowadays
    4.
    Billy would get fined if he was caught. The father probably wouldn’t spank him but would probably ground him.
    5.
    lol, where did you get this idea? AT best he could get suspended for a few days, the school would handle it internally. I agree its an annoying policy but it does make a little sense. He would not get his car searched for drugs and weapons, would serve zero jail time.

    Granted, all of this comes from the liberal state of Maine. Who knows how oppressive the state of Texas might be :p

  2. CamilleT says:

    Do you think that, if Jesus had children of his own, that he would have beat them?
    Or condoned them fighting one another?

    • Terry A. Hurlbut says:

      He who withholds his rod hates his son,
      But he who loves him disciplines him diligently.
      Proverbs 13:24. Look it up.

  3. yarnoiser says:

    The article appears to be making the claim that the removal of the ten commandants from public schools is the direct cause of violent crime in schools. However I don’t see an obvious cause and effect relationship here, and I’m unsure of how this can be true given the downward trend in violent crime in recent years:

    http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2011/crime-in-the-u.s.-2011/tables/table-1

    Granted, schools do take greater security precautions today than they did in 1962, but I don’t see how a change in the content of school lessons would directly impact the likelihood of a violent crime occurring at a given school. Are there any studies to substantiate this claim, or at least establishing a more detailed causal relationship? Much has changed since 1962 in addition to the removal of the ten commandments from public schools.

  4. MDB says:

    1962 — Jane wants to take math and science classes, because she’s been inspired by the space program. She’s told, “Don’t be ridiculous, how will that help you find a good husband? Home ec is over here.”

    2013 — Jane is the top student in her class, goes on to college and a brilliant career in a high tech field.

    1962 — Tim, an African-American child, wants to go to the good schools in town, is rejected, because they’re whites only

    2013 — Tim gets to to go the good schools, and is amazed to learn that there was once a time he would have been barred from schools because of his skin color

    1962 — Tattooed long-haired Bradllee shows up at a school, asking if his rock band can perform during schools hours. He is shown the door.

    2013 — Tattooed long-haired Bradllee shows up at a school, asking if his rock band can perform. He’s allowed, but the faculty, parents and students are outraged to learn that he deliberately obscured his agenda to present a socially and politically extreme message.

  5. MDB says:

    “spare the rod and spoil the child”, huh, Terry?

    Are you so uncreative that you think hitting a kid is the only form of discipline?

    • Terry A. Hurlbut says:

      That’s like asking me whether I am so uncreative that I think two plus two must equal four and only four.

  6. CowHammer says:

    “That’s like asking me whether I am so uncreative that I think two plus two must equal four and only four.”

    So… no then? I’m not sure if you’re just trying to make some weird point or if you seriously can’t come up with any other punishment for a child for the crime of breaking a neighbor’s window other than beating them. Perhaps make them help the neighbor with yard work for a while as compensation? If some kid broke my car window and the father told me “Don’t worry. I beat him real hard for it,” I’d just wonder what good that did to rectify the situation.

    • Terry A. Hurlbut says:

      Using the impersonal rod of authority, in a manner calculated to inflict a sharp reminder but not cause permanent injury, is not a “beating.” It is indeed typical of liberals like you that you see no middle course between lack of correction, and overzealous correction.

  7. CowHammer says:

    “Using the impersonal rod of authority, in a manner calculated to inflict a sharp reminder but not cause permanent injury, is not a “beating.” It is indeed typical of liberals like you that you see no middle course between lack of correction, and overzealous correction.”

    Sigh. Terry, you have a really bad habit of ignoring the main thrust of posts and singling out one little detail to reply to. OK then, here’s my amended post:

    So… no then? I’m not sure if you’re just trying to make some weird point or if you seriously can’t come up with any other punishment for a child for the crime of breaking a neighbor’s window other than using the impersonal rod of authority, in a manner calculated to inflict a sharp reminder but not cause permanent injury. Perhaps make them help the neighbor with yard work for a while as compensation? If some kid broke my car window and the father told me “Don’t worry. I used the impersonal rod of authority, in a manner calculated to inflict a sharp reminder but not cause permanent injury for it,” I’d just wonder what good that did to rectify the situation.

    • Terry A. Hurlbut says:

      Good discipline requires both: the penalty and the restitution. Otherwise the child will never learn the most important lesson of all: don’t break the window to begin with.

  8. MDB says:

    Again, you are still dodging the question: do you think there is any appropriate way to discipline a child other than physical force?

    Do you really think a seventeen year old would learn more from a spanking than he would from, say, taking away his car keys and his cell phone for two weeks?

    And despite your strawman argument, I am not opposed in general to physical discipline. I am arguing that it is not the only way to discipline a child, especially as the child gets older.

    It’s an example of your extreme loyalty to Biblical literalism that you cannot see that “spare the rod” refers to discipline in general, and is not a call to use spanking as the only form of discipline.

    Or are you an adherent of the Pearls and “No Greater Joy”?

    • Terry A. Hurlbut says:

      I suggest there is no effective way of disciplining a child without physical force. One would hope that only a few demonstrations would suffice. But without any threat of such force, a kid will keep seeing what he can get away with. That is human nature.

  9. MDB says:

    (Slowly waking away, shaking my head.)

    At least you finally admitted it. I’m curious if you’re a “No Greater Joy” type, though.

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