Category Archives: Constitution

Same-sex marriage: new block?

The Constitution assumed local control of most government functions, not the current centralized system.
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Earlier this month, the U.S. Supreme Court let stand without comment several rulings by different Circuit Courts of Appeals. Result: same-sex marriage now is the law in up to 33 States. Everyone, including de facto President Barack Obama, assumed same-sex marriage would soon be the rule across the land. But a federal judge in Puerto Rico just threw up another roadblock. This could set up a “circuit split” to force the Court to rule even faster than it planned.

Thank you, Houston

The Constitution assumed local control of most government functions, not the current centralized system.
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Recently the town council of Houston added its name to a long list of constitutional bullies. It recently attempted to infringe upon its citizens 1st Amendment rights by conducting a witch hunt against Houston’s churches in an attempt to find something that will justify removing their tax exempt status. But its actions may have proven that the proverbial last straw does actually exist when it comes to assaults against our rights to worship freely. Not only have Houston’s churches refused to submit to politically correct bullies; they have done what churches around the country should have been doing since 1954. When Lyndon B. Johnson subversively attached the Johnson Amendment to a piece of IRS legislation and silenced the political voice of the churches, the churches remained silent. But not this time. This time Houston may have gone too far and forced the churches to finally take a stand. And for that, we thank you, Houston!

Texas voter ID law in effect

Ballot box. The Texas voter ID law will stop people from stuffing this.
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This fall, the Texas Voter ID law will take full force and effect. The Supreme Court voted, six to two, not to stop it. The usual suspects complained about it. They suggested Texas meant to stop people from voting. True: Texas did mean to stop people from voting. Illegal voters.

Us v. them. Problem: us

Constitution Day meme. Can Liberty Amendments serve that purpose?
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In a world with an “us versus them” mentality, it’s always “them” that are the problem… right? We’re never the cause of our own troubles, that would be unthinkable. It’s always the other guy who fouls everything up. We’re innocent. If only the whole world were left to us, it would be a utopian paradise.

Lawbreaking lawmakers

The Second Amendment is the reset button on the Constitution
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The growth of tyranny in the massive bureaucracy of the Federal government has awakened too few and seems to have even fewer concerned.  But some are. They are not only willing to do something about it, they are organized and on the move.

Demilitarizing local police

OTher than police, what should governemnt do for people?
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A welcome trend has started in small-town and small-county police departments. They are giving back that surplus military hardware they got under the 1033 program. Many have found out it costs them to keep that hardware up, and plenty. But local citizens now also realize when their police get military gear, they become soldiers, not law enforcers. And that threatens their liberties.

21st Century Racketeers

The Constitution assumed local control of most government functions, not the current centralized system.
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Back in the days of Al Capone, racketeers could usually be found in Speakeasies or clandestinely taking numbers on dimly lit street corners. Today’s racketeers can be more difficult to identify since they don’t carry Tommy guns in violin cases or go by the names of Scarface or Pretty Boy Floyd anymore. As times changed, so did their mode of operation. The racketeers of the 21st century may be charming but they are every bit as nefarious as their 20th century counterparts.

Eric Holder to Supreme Court?

Supreme Court rules for Hobby Lobby
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Does de facto President Barack Obama want to appoint Eric Holder to the Supreme Court of the United States? Chuck Norris fears so. But he might want to take heart. Insurmountable resistance might come from a quarter no one expected.

National Criminal Registry

The Constitution assumed local control of most government functions, not the current centralized system.
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The Federal gun law of 1994 is about to expire.  This law made it illegal to manufacture or own a semi-automatic weapon that would let the user handle and fire the weapon skilfully.  It limited the magazine capacity for these weapons while not limiting how many magazines one could own.

Third Amendment case law

The Constitution assumed local control of most government functions, not the current centralized system.
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The Nevada case of Mitchell v. City of Henderson still slogs through the Nevada Federal District Court. This case has one unusual feature. It accuses police in two cities of quartering themselves in two private houses without the consent of their owners. This would breach the Third Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which deals with quartering of soldiers. The defendant city officials say police officers are not soldiers. But the Mitchells actually have a thirty-two-year-old precedent on their side. That case says one need not be an active-duty U.S. armed service member to be a “soldier” under the Constitution.