Tag Archives: evidence

Creation: clash of theories

vapor canopy theory illustrated

The creation science movement has not been able to speak with one voice for years. And now we know why. Less than two weeks ago, a bold commentator broke decades of unproductive silence on the real issue. One man, among all creation scientists, has a unified and comprehensive theory of the Global Flood. That man is Walter T. Brown Jr., and that theory is the Hydroplate Theory. Now we know the real reason why the larger creation movement rejected it out-of-hand. And the grounds were not scientific, and still aren’t.

Media & Dems: evil consortium

James Risen writes for this paper. He told them what he thinks, and it is not pretty.

During the past 5 or more decades we have experienced the good, the bad and the ugly of Progressivism.  The degradation of our society and our country, which began slowly and stealthily, has gone into overdrive with such torrents of speed it’s nearly impossible to track.

Sea plankton in earth orbit?

Diatoms, the smallest of sea plankton

The Russian flight director for the International Space Station said this week two cosmonauts had found sea plankton, or traces of them, on the outer hull and window of a Russian module of the International Space Station. If this proves out, they might have proved a key part of the hydroplate theory of the Global Flood without knowing it.

Energy of month redux

moon

In the days since CNAV published an article on the change of the length of the month, something interesting happened. Walt Brown, originator of the Hydroplate Theory, realized he’d overlooked something. This often happens when one proposes a unifying theory to explain all the changes in our world, and the solar system, from one event. Especially an event as violent as the Global Flood.

Energy to change a month

moon

The Global Flood did more than change the length of the day. It changed the length of the month, or the period of the moon. Is that even feasible? Yes, once we know the Flood produced enough nuclear energy to eject three percent of the earth’s mass into space. Much of that material cost the moon enough of its energy to drop it into a lower orbit.

Energy to change a calendar

Amenemhet I, adopter of the 365-day Egyptian solar calendar

On July 7, the National Creationism Examiner discussed the history of the calendar. At issue: the ancient Egyptians, of all people, had the best natural season indicator: the Nile flood season. Why, then, did they keep a 360-day calendar for centuries? The natural calendar of the earth changed. The Egyptians took time to readjust their official calendar, but they did, beginning with the Twelfth Dynasty (Amenamhāt I, the “Pharaoh who did not know Joseph.”)

Science, religion and law

Triceratops horridus as a scientist thinks it might have looked.

Must science always contradict religious tradition to stay valid? What happened to following evidence where it leads? Lawyers for a scientist who lost his job over his work will now ask that in court.

Scientist fired for discovery

Triceratops horridus as a scientist thinks it might have looked.

Can a scientist lose his job for discovering something new and telling the community about it? It happened recently. And the scientist who lost his job, is going to court to get it back. And that case threatens to pit creation against evolution in a trial to rival Tennessee v. Scopes.

Global warming and prophecy

An illustration of prophecy

Global warming, (a/k/a climate change), is a peculiar tenet embraced by liberals. Although the modern liberal movement may think they are the founders of this movement, Adam and Eve were the first environmentalists. They were instructed by God to take care of the garden and treat the animals properly (Gen. 1:28). Today uber-liberals have also become uber-environmentalists, and as is the case in other instances, their extremism has perverted noble intentions.

Apollo 11: leaving the moon

Apollo 11 official insigne

Forty-five years ago today, two men finished walking on the moon after two and a half hours. They then began the second most important part of their trip: coming back alive.